Round 2 of the HICC Open Rapid 2015

Round 2 saw some fireworks, and some slight upsets from the juniors in the competition.

In a very back-and-forth game between juniors Joshua Perin and William Rumley, William had a crushing position early in the game but missed some critical lines and allowed Joshua to equalise.  Then, Joshua missed some tactics that would have seen his central passed pawn queen for the win.  In the end it was William who queened after the game entered an interesting and theoretically drawn position.

PERIN,Joshua (1165) - RUMLEY,William (871)

HICC Open Rapid HICC Clubrooms (2), 23.03.2015

Position after 19. g3

Position after 19. g3

1.e4 c5 2.c4 Nc6 3.Nc3 e6 4.Nf3 Nge7 5.d3 d5 6.cxd5 exd5 7.Bg5 h6 8.Bxe7 Nxe7 9.Rc1 d4 10.Ne2 Ng6 11.a3 Be6 12.b4 b6 13.Qd2 cxb4 14.axb4 a5 15.bxa5 bxa5 16.Nfxd4 Bb4 17.Rc3 Rc8 18.Nxe6 fxe6 19.g3 (diagram to the right) 0–0

[19...Ne5 is a hard move to spot in a rapid and many seasoned players would have just taken the exchange on move 17, but this line is crushing 20.Bg2 Nxd3+ 21.Kf1 Bxc3 22.Nxc3 0–0 (diagram below)]

After the sideline 22. ... O-O

After the sideline 22. ... O-O

20.Bh3 Qf6 21.d4?  In a rapid game we shouldn't be too hard on mistakes, but there is still something to be learned from them.  Black's position is commanding and he's going to win the exchange or the rook outright on c3, but losing the rook is actually the lesser of the 2 evils.  White should first take care of the invasion point on f2.

 

[21.0–0 Bxc3 22.Nxc3 Qxc3 23.Bxe6+ Kh8 24.Rd1]

21...Qxf2+ 22.Kd1 Rxc3 An interesting choice not to play Bxc3. 23.Nxc3 Qf3+ 24.Kc2 Bxc3 25.Qxc3 Qxe4+ 26.Qd3–+ Rc8+? Until now black has kept the pressure up to his opponent, but selects the wrong check.

After the sideline 28. ... Rf3+

After the sideline 28. ... Rf3+

[26...Rf2+ 27.Kc3 Qc6+ 28.Qc4 Rf3+ After the Rf2+ there are many ways to win, this is one example, all roads lead to a material advantage for black. (diagram right)]

27.Kd2 Qxh1 28.Bxe6+ Kh7 29.Bxc8= Now the position is equal, with white's central passer a potentially deadly asset. Qxh2+ 30.Kc3 Qa2 31.d5 Qa1+ 32.Kc4 Qc1+ 33.Qc3 Ne5+ 34.Kd4 Qg5 35.d6 Qf6 36.Kd5 Nd7 37.Qxf6 

[37.Qd3+ a missed opportunity Kh8 38.Bxd7+–]

37...Nxf6+ 38.Kc4 Ne4?? 39.d7?? The double blunder, so typical of rapid play when the clock is ticking, [39.Bf5+ forking the knight seals the win for white]

39...Nd6+ 40.Kb3

[40.Kd5 Nf7 41.Ke6 Kg6 applying the squeeze when white's pieces have much more freedom than black's.]

Position after 49. ... h3.

Position after 49. ... h3.

40...Nf7 41.Bb7 Kg6 42.Bd5 Nd8 43.Ka4 Kf6 44.Bc4 Ke7 45.Bb5 g5 46.Kxa5 h5 47.Kb4 h4 48.gxh4 gxh4 49.Kc5 h3= (Diagram left)

The position is dead equal, but like many of these sorts of positions both sides must play the correct moves or else the other shall triumph.  Unfortunately did not the find the correct move.

 

50.Kb6?? h2 51.Bc6 Nxc6 52.Kxc6 h1Q+–+ 53.Kc7 Qc1+ 54.Kb6 Kxd7 55.Kb5 Qc3 56.Kb6 Qc4 57.Kb7 Qb5+ 58.Ka7 Kc6 59.Ka8 Qb7#  0–1

 

In an utterly crazy game Adam Rutledge got over Les Hay.  Les tried his time tested Alekhine's against Adam's 1. e4, and Adam replied with his time tested (but slightly less proven) 2. Qf3!?  From here on in the board exploded into craziness with White being on the good side in the end and managing to hold a potentially confusing P+N+B+K vs. K endgame which could have resulted in black capturing the lone pawn and leaving Adam with 50 moves to mate with the 2 minor pieces.

RUTLEDGE,Adam (626) - HAY,Les (1133)

HICC Open Rapid HCC Clubrooms (2), 23.03.2015 

Position after 35. ... Bh6

Position after 35. ... Bh6

 1.e4 Nf6 2.Qf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nd4 4.Qc3 c5 5.e5 Ne4 6.Qd3 d6 7.Qxe4 Bf5 8.Qf4 Nxc2+ 9.Kf1 Bg6 10.Bb5+ Qd7 11.Bxd7+ Kxd7 12.Qa4+ Kc7 13.exd6+ exd6 14.Nc3 Re8 15.g3 Nxa1 16.Nd5+ Kd8 17.d3 Bxd3+ 18.Kg2 Be4+ 19.f3 Bxd5 20.Bg5+ f6 21.Bd2 Re6 22.Qxa7 Kd7 23.Qa4+ Bc6 24.Qg4 h5 25.Qf5 g6 26.Qxg6 Be7 27.Qf5 Rg8 28.Nh3 Re8 29.Nf4 Bf8 30.Re1 Bxf3+ 31.Kxf3 Nc2 32.Rxe6 Nd4+ 33.Ke4 Nxf5 34.Rxe8 Kxe8 35.Kxf5 Bh6 36.Ba5 Kf7 37.Bc7 d5 38.Nxd5 Bg5 39.h4 Bc1 40.b3 Ba3 41.Bd8 b5 42.Nxf6 c4 43.Nd5 Bb2

Final Position - Black resigned.

Final Position - Black resigned.

44.Ba5 Bd4 45.bxc4 bxc4 46.a4 Kg7 47.Kg5 Bf2 48.g4 Bd4 49.gxh5 Kh7 50.Nf6+ Kg7 51.Nd5 Kh7 52.Kg4 Kh6 53.Bc3 Bc5 54.a5 Ba7 55.a6 Kh7 56.Kf4 Kh6 57.Ne3 Kxh5 58.Nxc4 Kxh4 59.Ba5 Bb8+ 60.Ke4 Kg5 61.Na3 Kf6 62.Nb5 Ke6 63.Bc7 Ba7 64.Nxa7 Kd7 65.Nb5 Kc8 66.a7 Kb7 67.Kd4 Ka8 68.Bb6 Kb7 69.Nc7   1–0

 

 

Scott Cohen defeated Ian Little in a King's Indian Defence that exploded in  typical KID fashion.  On move 14 Little missed a critical complicating line in which all the tactics stood in his favour, and then in time trouble made the decisive mistake on move 24.

COHEN,Scott (1666) - LITTLE,Ian (1516)

HICC Open Rapid HICC Clubrooms (2), 23.03.2015

The critical position after 14. Nh4

The critical position after 14. Nh4

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.h3 0–0 6.Nf3 Nbd7 7.Be2 e5 8.d5 Nc5 9.Qc2 a5 10.Bg5 h6 11.Be3 b6 12.b3 Nh5 13.g3 f5 14.Nh4 (diagram right) Qf6

[14...Nf4! 15.Bxc5

a) 15.Bxf4 exf4 16.e5 (16.Nxg6 Qf6 17.Nxf8 Qxc3+ 18.Qxc3 Bxc3+ 19.Kf1 Bxa1) 16...Kh7;

b) 15.gxf4 Qxh4;

15...bxc5 16.Bf3 Qf6 17.0–0–0]

Position after 24. ... e3+

Position after 24. ... e3+

15.Bxh5 gxh5 16.Nxf5 Bxf5 17.exf5 e4 18.Kd2 Qxf5 19.Raf1 Rae8 20.Nb5 Qd7 21.Nd4 Qf7 22.Qd1 Qg6 23.Rhg1 Bxd4 24.Bxd4 e3+?(Diagram left)

The time pressure mistake.  Black opens the way for the invasion with his queen, but the attack isn't working.  If instead he infiltrates with Nd3, he can hold the position and possibly retain an advantage.

 

[24...Nd3 25.f4 exf3 26.Rxf3 Rxf3 27.Qxf3 Nb4]

25.fxe3 Qd3+ 26.Kc1 White avoids the mating net and leaves black in trouble.

[26.Ke1?? Rxe3+ 27.Bxe3 Qxe3+ 28.Qe2 Nd3+ 29.Kd1 Qc1#]

26...Rxf1 27.Qxf1 Qe4 28.g4 Nd3+ 29.Kd2 h4 30.Qf5 Nc5 31.Rf1 Qg2+ 32.Rf2 Ne4+ 33.Kc1 Qxf2 34.Qg6+ Kf8 35.Qg7#  1–0